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Adjutant
 
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Post 05 Mar 2021, 1:34 pm

It is interesting how people assess risk. The same thing is going on in minority communities which have been hard hit by Covid but are still reluctant to take the vaccine. Doing something actively that might have a slight risk is something to be instinctively avoided even if there is a much greater passive risk that could be avoided. Something rooted in human psychology I guess.
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Post 11 Mar 2021, 10:47 am

Just received the first Pfizer dose ... no issues so far ... feels real good to know that in about 4 weeks I will have very little to worry about ... I haven't minded social isolation that much, but the psychological lift is real.
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Post 11 Mar 2021, 1:04 pm

Ray Jay wrote:Just received the first Pfizer dose ... no issues so far ... feels real good to know that in about 4 weeks I will have very little to worry about ... I haven't minded social isolation that much, but the psychological lift is real.


Got mine yesterday. No problems, and my second dose is already set for March 31. I don't expect much difference in the near term as I will be the only person vaccinated in my household for a while yet, but there is a light on the horizon.
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Post 12 Mar 2021, 9:15 am

Did you have to line up and wait for a shot, or was there a reservation system in place?
Hospital? Clinic? Pharmacy?
Did they cost you anything?
Just wondering.

Its interesting to read the beginning of this thread again.
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Post 12 Mar 2021, 12:27 pm

rickyp wrote:Did you have to line up and wait for a shot, or was there a reservation system in place?
Hospital? Clinic? Pharmacy?
Did they cost you anything?
Just wondering.


I made a reservation for a specific time and place. It was run by the State of NY out of the huge Javits Center, which is NYC's largest convention center. It was staffed largely by the national guard, with the exception of the nurse. It was free and they did not ask for my insurance info. Once I was inside, things went smoothly and quickly. They seem like they have enough staff to do more, but are still constrained by supply.

A big complaint is with the technology of the reservation system which is poor. I only got my reservation because I follow @turbovax on Twitter, which is basically some guy that has a bot scraping all the open time slots on the different web sites and then tweets them out. I was up late one night and some fresh reservations appeared and I was lucky enough to nab one. I expect that it will become easier to get a slot over the next month, but right now, those reservations are hard to get.

They announced at my site that they were doing 4,500 shots that day. I could certainly see them doing that many and even more if they had enough supply.
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Post 12 Mar 2021, 10:28 pm

Scheduled for March 15 which is the first day im eligible. Kaiser sent me a text, I went on their website, and made an appointment. Much easier than I expected to be to get an appointment.
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Post 13 Mar 2021, 8:11 am

This post from Danivon from April 30, 2020 looks pretty dang good in retrospect....

bbauska wrote:How is herd immunity ever achieved unless people get the virus?

Danivin: "With a vaccine.

One issue with the aim of getting herd immunity without one is that it relies on immunity being achievable from getting the disease. It may be that it is not guaranteed. It may also be that the disease mutates enough (like its cousins influenza and the common cold) that you can't be immune to all strains from having had one of them. 

And one major factor in the speed of mutation is how many people get infected - because that's how viruses mutate, when they replicate in a host, and using genetic material in the host. The more people infected, and the greater genetic variation the virus encounters, the bigger the chance of mutations that are viable and distinct.

I am all for people making the decisions to open their business or not. I am all for people having the choice to go out or not. 

If a person CHOOSES to not interact and avoid the virus, well, they have that choice.

This is all very well, but of course the risk is not evenly distributed. Those at greatest risk include the healthcare workers who have to deal with those who fall seriously ill. If too many people 'choose' to get infected, hospitals will be overwhelmed and be unable to cope with Covid 19 patients and with others who need care."

Yeah, lockdown sucks, but it is gambling with lives to undo it. Not just yours, but those around you."
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Post 22 Mar 2021, 12:02 am

freeman3 wrote:Scheduled for March 15 which is the first day im eligible. Kaiser sent me a text, I went on their website, and made an appointment. Much easier than I expected to be to get an appointment.

How did it go?
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Post 22 Mar 2021, 9:33 am

No real issues. My arm was a little sore. I got the J&J shot so only need the one shot. From what I understand, it takes about two weeks for the effect to be fully felt. It's great to have that protection, that im not going to get really sick, but psychologically it's going to take a while to get used to mingling with people. And thats not going to happen for quite a while, anyway.

I doubt my behavior will change until the virus is under control and there are very few cases. For one thing, it's still not clear about vaccinated people being able to transmit the disease. For another as long as cases are high you dont know if a variant will come along that your vaccine wont protext against. I figure a few more months is no big deal. By June or July with a large percentage of people being vaccinated and the virus not as virulent, maybe things will get back to normal. Whatever the new normal turns out to be...
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Post 23 Mar 2021, 9:06 am

" For one thing, it's still not clear about vaccinated people being able to transmit the disease. "

I thought that, like other viruses, one can carry Covid 19, and shed it to infect others, even though your immunity protects you from its affects. .

Herd immunity for Covid, will only be achieved at 80 to 90% vaccination rate. (Measles is 95%) It will be interesting to see if that is achievable everywhere.

[url]https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/herd-immunity-lockdowns-and-covid-19?gclid=Cj0KCQjwo-aCBhC-ARIsAAkNQit3goAatZYbGT0Aiz17jwmzn9p
YEwRVEqTQwwl0Whd0G77m21tczuwaAg_7EALw_wcB#[/url]
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Post 24 Mar 2021, 2:22 am

The evidence is not conclusive...but there are indications that once vaccinated the chances of actually causing an infection in someone else are much reduced.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.vox.co ... rna-pfizer
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Post 24 Mar 2021, 2:26 am

It doesnt seem likely that we'll get that high of a percentage vaccinated in the US. We just have to hope that a combination of vaccinated people with people who have some level of immunity due to prior infection gets us there.
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Post 24 Mar 2021, 2:38 am

Whats concerning about this virus is that as long as it continues to propagate world-wide it just continues to generates variants that are a little more efficient at transmission and a little bit more deadly. I just dont recall ever facing a virus like this before. Yes, it is still not very lethal. But when you project into the future and if we allow this virus to basically perfect itself as a more and more efficient pathogen, it's a little scary ro think where it might lead. People need to reflect on the minor risks of getting vaccinated versus the risk of not stamping the virus out for good. We cannot allow this virus to continue to evolve. This is a war. Do your part.
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Post 24 Mar 2021, 6:28 am

Freeman:
t just continues to generates variants that are a little more efficient at transmission and a little bit more deadly. I just dont recall ever facing a virus like this before.


All viruses evolve this way. They maximize survival by becoming better spreaders and less lethal so they stay in their hosts longer. Evolution at work ...
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Post 24 Mar 2021, 3:01 pm

Absolutely. But what causes a virus to stick around for the long-haul? AIDs was a virus that was not very transmittable but did not kill the host for a long time. The flu virus transmits pretty well and is not very lethal. So the reality is we can deal with those viruses without changing our society. Ebola is not vey transmittable and very lethal so it burns itself out quickly. Sars was lethal and transmittable but only after being got sick so it was possible to isolate people and stamp out the virus quickly.

But Covid is the "just right" virus: not that lethal, very transmittable, and transmittable before symptoms so very hard to isolate people and stamp it out. So if a third or more of people dont get vaccinated we may have to keep dealing with this again and again as the virus just keeps mutating in people who carry the virus because they wont get vaccinated.